Gadgets and Gizmos

Buying the latest gadgets and gizmos is one of those major highs for the techno savvy that has few parallels. In particular if they are high tech gadgets or computer gadgets. The mere announcement of the tablet display, sized at 7″, by Apple has all computer aficionados in a whirl. The screen of this new device is practically the size of the gizmo itself. All in all as far as high tech gadgets go, this one promises to be a delectable blend of design and ingenuity.

Those hooked on acquiring the latest gadgets and gizmos, and who feel that Nook, Kindle and the like are old hat, now can revel in the world’s first dual screen device – the enTourage eDGe. It combines a notepad, notebook, e-reader, and video/audio recorder and player in one Linux with Google Android OS device. What does it do? Much of what you might want to at any given time – web surf, read an e-book, get email, watch movies or listen to music from anywhere. Essentially this is a student-friendly device aimed at freeing them from carrying books and notebooks. Since it is first and foremost an e-reader, the glare-free screen, zooming features, and the ability for a person to read in sunlight make it a particularly desirable gizmo. There is a journal page that can be opened and used by hand or with the help of a virtual keyboard – very useful for taking notes. This feature is enabled by e-ink technology, which further allows people to make notes on the book they are reading.

If latest computer gadgets are what you are hooked on, there are quite a few in the market just now. The Lenovo Multimedia Remote with 2.4GHz Wireless Keyboard comes in a compact style. Once connected, this multimedia remote can be used for using multimedia controls on the PC like with Windows Media Center. There is also the Bear Extender n3 which Rokland Technologies has recently rolled out. It is a long-range 802.11n high-powered wireless adapter for Macs that offers up to four times the range of standard Apple-branded Airport wireless cards. The Wi-Fi adapter combines 802.11n compatibility with a powerful 700mW Wi-Fi radio that enables the device to pick up 802.11g and 802.11b signals from long distances.

Best Small Business Tips and Ideas

Deciding to start a business can be one of the most exhilarating decisions you make in your life. We are living in a world wherever everyone wants to make extra money and add to his income. Most people have achieved this by acquiring great business ideas. When one starts up a company, he must be ready to meet competition. It is important to note that you would not need to become rich or popular to succeed in business but have to think smartly. But there are a lot of moving parts and many different elements to consider.

10 basic tips essential to start a business successfully.

Tip 1: Get inspired and Love your idea

Every business begins with an idea you may have imagined of opening your own business for years, or motivation may have hit you suddenly. Nevertheless of the source, the first step of starting your own business is coming up with a business idea. And as important as your idea, you must in love with the idea.

Tip 2: Do Your Research / learn everything about the business

You’ve recognized your big idea, now it’s time to balance it with the reality. Are you truly ready to start a business? Answer the questions below and see what you need to prepare yourself for business. For a small business succeed it must fulfill a need, solve a problem or offer something the market wants.

You can identify this need in many ways by doing research, focus groups, and even trial and error.

As you search the market, some of the questions can be:

• Is there a need for your anticipated services or products?
• Who needs it? (Target Costumers)
• Are there other companies offering similar services or products right now?
• How is the competition?
• Can or how will your business fit into the market?

Tip 3: Make a Business Plan

You need a business plan in order to make your business idea a reality. If you expect to seek monetary support from an investor or financial organization, a formal written business plan is a must.

Even if you don’t need monetary support, a simple business plan can give you precision about what you hope to accomplish and how you plan to do it.

In overall, your business plan should summary your business goals and the inspiration behind them, as well as your plan for realization of your goals in terms of marketing and funding.

Tip 4: Planning Finances

Opening a small business doesn’t have to involve a lot of money, but it will involve some investment.

There are a number of methods you can fund your small business:

• With Small business grants
• By Financing
• With Small business loans
• Or Angel investors

You can also attempt to get your business off the ground by bootstrapping, using as little capital as necessary to start your business.

Tip 5: Business Structure

Your small business can be an individual ownership, a partnership, a limited liability company (LLC) or a corporation. The business structure you might choose will impact in many factors from your business name, to liability, and how you file your taxes.

You can choose an initial business structure, and with time re-evaluate and change your structure as your business grows and needs to be changed.Tip 6: The Business Name

The name you choose plays a role in almost every aspect of your business, so you want it to be a good one. Make sure you think through all of the possible consequences as you explore your options and select your business name.

Once you have selected a name, there is the need to check if it’s trademarked, currently in use and if stills free you will need to register it. A individual proprietor must register their business name with either their state or county clerk. Corporations, LLC, or limited corporations usually register their business name when the creation paperwork is filed.

These days you need to have a website, so please don’t forget to register your domain name once you have selected your business name. The best domains and more valuable online are the ones ending with .com.

Tip 7: Licenses and Permits

There are a range of small business licenses and permits that may apply to your situation, depending on the type of business you are starting and where you are placed. You will need to inquiry what licenses and permits apply to your business during the initial process.

Tip 8: The Business Location

Setting up your place to work is essential for the operation of your business, whether you will have a home office, a shared or private office space, or a retail location. You will need to reflect about your place, equipment, and overall setup, and make sure your business place works for the kind of business you will be doing.

Tip 9: Accounting System

One of the most essential systems for a small business is an accounting system. Your accounting system is essential in order to build and manage your budget, set your charges, conduct business with others, and file your taxes. You can set up your accounting system by your own, or hire an accountant to take away some of the work.

Tip 10: Promote Your Small Business

As soon your business is up and running, you need to start attracting customers. You’ll want to initiate with the essentials by writing a single selling offer and building a marketing plan. Explore as many small business marketing ideas as you can so you to choose how to promote your business most successfully. Completed these business start-up actions, you will have all of the most important small business bases protected, and be prepared for small business success.

15 Business Ideas to Generate Extra Income

If you want or need to start a side job because you still need to wait a little bit longer to start your own business, here are 15 suggestions for you.

1. Make money Blogging

If you enjoy writing, find a theme you’re passionate about and start a blog dedicated to covering that theme and anything else interesting you enjoy to talk about. All you need is a laptop, some time, and inspiration to consistently write. It can start as a hobby and turn into a business over time. Creating a blog is free, but if you want to look professional it can cost less than $ 12 per month.

2. Buying or selling on eBay

Thanks to internet there are more opportunities to make money than ever to buy and resell products for extra money. There are lots of people buy at a discount and resell them on eBay for profit.

3. Freelance writing

If you’re great with words, you might be capable to find some work as an online freelancer. A variety of publications need online content in the form of product, stories, service descriptions, and reports, and if you have the talent and ability, you could easily be the one to create them. Luckily, all you need is a computer and Internet connection to get started. You can start here freelancer.com

4. Social media expert

Now a day almost everyone uses Facebook, Twitter, and Pinterest, but did you know that many companies are willing to compensate people to support them managing their social media accounts and sometimes you can do it part-time from home. If this appeals you, to find social media jobs you can start by writing companies with a social media presence and visiting sites like Elance.com for opportunities.

5. Proofreading and editing

Do you have strong English skills and outstanding grammar? You may have chances to work as a proof-reader from home. Marketing for this can be hard; seek out those who might actually be able to use your services and advertise directly to them.

6. Virtual assistant

Many companies and individual professionals like having someone who can check and answer their email, organize task lists for them, someone who can update their calendars, and perform other administrative tasks, with minimal communication. The best of being a virtual assistant is that you can offer this service from home with a good Internet connection.

7. Website design

If you know a little bit about web design you can approach small businesses in your community, as they could use a very basic web presence to tell others about their business. These businesses usually don’t have a large budget for websites and create a great yet simple website is for you, get a bunch of clients from your local community, create sites for them, and maintains them for a small fee. You can easily get enough businesses to have a nice side business of your own with a low investment.

8. Affiliate marketing

Certain types of online businesses will pay you to promote their products and encourage sales. If you’re interested in learning more, check out affiliate marketing programs such as Click-bank, Commission Junction, and these websites are trustworthy and you can earn money by posting their products in your blog, website or Facebook. The secret of online business is all knowing targeting the right public and marketing efficiently. It can be overwhelming with all the information available online as more than 50% of the information is just a waste of time.

9. Become a business or life coach

If you are a good speaker and passionate about the business world and able to inspire and encourage others in a unique way, you could marketing your services as a business or even a life coach. Take your passion and expertise to the next level giving advice and suggest actionable steps people can take to progress their professional and private lives. 10. Start a resume writing service

If you’re excellent at writing remarkable resumes that in the end result in people getting the job, contemplate advertising those services. Most of your work will spin around writing, editing, designing, and proofreading, so you will only need few supplies outside of your computer and basic software to get started.

11. App Developer

Web app development is the creation of application programs that reside on remote servers and are delivered to the user’s device over the Internet. Now a day you can do apps with software’s you don’t really need to be a weirdo to do it, you can be an app developer for Facebook for instance and of course you can do it part-time and home based.

12. Business Consultant

If you are high organized and skilled being a good problem solver this job is for you. Companies bring Business Consultant to identify their problems, provide solutions and optimize companies. The only investments are your skills.

13. Data Entry Service

Many companies and online businesses require some type of manual information tracking, creating a vast amount of data entry work. Although there are many work-at-home scams related with data entry work, there are a lot of genuine chances available for genuine data entry businesses. If you are an excellent typist with an eye for detail, a data entry business is a great idea for you.

14. Freelance Writer

If you have the skill to write and inform people in a certain area, you can write small books or guides and sell them online, the biggest books platform is Amazon.com, where you can display your books for free and when they are sold, you will receive a percentage from the selling. Payments are made every month depending on your sales. Investment is only your time to write and imagination.

15. Internet Researcher

The Internet provides a vast amount of information. If you can quickly and efficiently navigate through that wealth of information, and essentially find a needle in a haystack, you can create a very successful business as an Internet researcher. Search for this kind of job online or about a company which is looking for this of service.

I give you only a glimpse what you could do, and these are just a few ideas, but many ideas were left behind.

First of all I advise you to think what you like to do as a hobby or in your free time, why don’t you make profit from what you are doing already?

You have the world as your disposal, but for a business to work out the first thing from all things is, it doesn’t matter what you intent to do, but you have to love it. If you love what you do it doesn’t feel like a job, you will be doing it with joy and this way you will be successful.

There are some side business opportunities that have grown more common in the past few years. And thanks to internet you have much more opportunities, ideas and help to develop your business.

Are You an Entrepreneur or a Small Business Owner?

Do you want to be an Entrepreneur or a Small Business Owner? Is there a difference, and does it matter?

There is a difference, and it’s easy to confuse the two or use the two terms interchangeably. A Small Business Owner owns their own business, but also actively participates in that business. Often the Small Business Owner is critical to the ongoing success of the company. Without him or her, the business either does not exist (i.e. medical, legal, accounting, consulting, freelancing) or would suffer greatly in the owner’s absence for any period of time.

We often use the term “Solopreneur” to refer to the individual practitioner who is their own boss but must personally deliver a service or create a product for their business to generate revenue. While this may certainly be better than working for someone else, it’s still about trading time for money – and time is our most limited resource.

Whether you are a Solopreneur or a Small Business Owner, you likely own a business that depends primarily on you. Perhaps the business is run by you and a couple of other founders. The point is, only a few people know and can execute on the secret recipe at the foundation of your business. And those key people must be present for the business to operate. An Entrepreneur instead builds a business and supporting systems that are independent from the founder. The founder may well be an integral (or exclusive) part of the businesses initially, but the goal is always to grow the business to the point where the owner does not have to be involved in day-to-day operations. When you build a business that continues to generate revenues in your absence, then you have created a truly leveraged model and can call yourself an Entrepreneur.

Many of us start as Small Business Owners, enjoy success, and grow our companies. We may then move on to creating a larger business that does not require us to be present, and we graduate to the level of Entrepreneurship. If we repeat this multiple times, then we may call ourselves Serial Entrepreneurs.

“Entrepreneurship is the pursuit of opportunity without regard to resources currently controlled.”
Howard Stevenson, Harvard Business School Professor.

You may not be clear at the start as to which one you want to grow up to be, an Entrepreneur or a Small Business Owner. But by asking yourself a series of hard questions, and honestly assessing your true desires, you are more likely to start a business that suits you best. And it’s certainly acceptable if you want to be Small Business Owner… we are not saying that’s a bad thing. But it’s important for you to begin understanding the difference between the two as it may impact the type of business you build and how you plan to develop it.

It’s also important to avoid creating another low-paying harder-working “job”, like the one you may already have! Michael Gerber explains this situation best in his seminal book “The E-Myth”. This book is a must read for small business owners, with one of its major themes being the difference between working “in” your business (you make the pies) versus working “on” your business (others make the pies following your recipe and systems).

As you prepare to become your own boss, or if you have already started a small business, it’s important to keep your long-term vision in mind. Doing so will help you determine the type of business you start and build, helping ensure that you achieve your definition of success.

Do you want to be an Entrepreneur or a Small Business Owner? Here are some questions to ask to help you determine want you really want:

  1. Do you want to own just one or two locations (i.e. one or two franchise units, or your own practice) or do you want to create something bigger with multiple locations and perhaps grow internationally (i.e. offer franchises and hire others to run the business)?
  2. Do you want to work in the business (i.e. make the donuts) or do you want to have someone else manage the day-to-day operations (i.e. someone else makes the donuts following your instructions)?

  3. Are you looking for a job or are you looking to create a self-managing company (a business that does not rely on your day-to-day presence for success)?
  4. Do you prefer to create or do you enjoy executing?
  5. Do you envision creating multiple different businesses across multiple industries?
  6. Are you able to let go of all of the details, or are you a micro-manager?
  7. Are you the only person who can deliver your service or product, or can you teach others how to do it?
  8. Is your goal to work hard until a certain age and then retire, or continue creating and leading your businesses until you are no longer mentally capable?
  9. Can you sell your business as it currently operates and without you having to continue being part of it?

5 Challenges in Business Intelligence and How to Solve Them

Ever wondered what a well-planned and deployed business intelligence project can do for your business without all the challenges? By now if you’re not aggressively mining your data you’re not only leaving money on the table, you’re falling behind your competitors. Looking for basic aberrations and trends in data for sales, marketing, operations and customers is second nature to most companies. This will help you tread water for a time but did you know you unlock exponential value to your data once you reach cross functional, role based, and collaborative analysis which enables iterative business process improvement?

The challenges to operative data visibility are pretty easy to identify in a company. Do any of these ring a bell? You have a thousand spreadsheets stored on your network and different departments may have different values for the same measure? The executives have clear objectives and have a strategy but if you ask an individual contributor there is only a vague notion of what they are, or are pursuing their own department objectives? You have data, a vision for analyzing your marketing or industry metrics but your IT department takes so long to assist with setting up the reporting tools and infrastructure that it becomes irrelevant before you can act?

But let’s back up a little and first understand what business intelligence is in the first place. There are a lot of terms thrown around like analytics, ad hoc reporting, data warehouse, key performance indicators and forecasting to name a few. If you ask ten people you’re likely to get 20 answers to the same question. The fact is, business intelligence applied in a business environment is an ecosystem of both technical and business factors that drive performance in an organization aligned to strategic objectives. The business components like strategy mapping, business process improvement and collaboration are just as important to the technical reporting, warehouse and ETL tools.

The actual process for running or starting a business intelligence project is a prescriptive methodology that is very different from other types of projects and as such there are best practices based on the size of the organization, vertical, maturity, objectives and processes being measured. In some ways it’s both an art and a science.

In short form, you’ll thoroughly understand your company’s objectives and how your department fits into that story. Then analyze the different processes in your company that affect those performances. Determine the measures within those processes that can be affected by managing their performance. These should be as far back in the process as possible which we call leading indicators, those which can be changed before the results are locked into your balance sheet. Then on the business side you’ll start your internal marketing campaign, yes internal. And at the same time start to round up the data for your analysis. And this is when the real work begins!Though the following tips are not exhaustive or definitive, they are certainly some traps that a lot of organizations fall into while stepping up the BI Maturity Ladder from basic operational and transactional reporting to immersive and responsibility based performance management.

Executive sponsorship is critical but so is employee buy-in

Ever heard the term, “you can’t push a rope”? Leadership can have the greatest plans for moving the business forward but unless each and every contributor to the processes that affect the outcome have bought into the mission and actively participate, the movement won’t get very far. Yes you can use the hammer and tie incentives to performance immediately instead of over time for which you will receive immediate backlash as a result. Or better yet positive reinforcement by making progress and goals at a high level visible and celebrated for all to see and introduce some cross department competition on conformed measures. A good leader inspires the best in people, not the worst.

Pro tip: Leadership should make every effort to communicate not just on the metrics but also adoption and accuracy.

Drive vertical then go horizontal

Lofty enterprise goals are very hard to implement across an organization, it requires massive amounts of cooperation amongst departments to define measures, setup architecture and extract from complicated source systems which can be expensive. Instead start with one process that, for example, drives one channel of your sales funnel and then drive that vertical to the individual contributor level in the form or actionable reporting, “Here are the clients that need to be called today for satisfaction feedback”. In this way you can start to see immediate results and use it as a template to implement in your organization for other processes and departments.

Pro tip: Setup a regular BI governance and education roundtable meeting to foster communication and iterative improvement among the BI stewards at all levels.

Stay focused on the business drivers, not the technical hurdles

There is an odd dichotomy to business intelligence depending on your business or technical background. If you are a business person maybe you’ve heard of the Kimball methodology for data warehouse design. If you haven’t that’s okay but that’s what your IT professionals are using to build out your backend data repository and this may not always provide the data in the form that you need from a business perspective. It is an object oriented approach to data that, depending on the complexity of the data sources, can take months or years to develop and deploy. If your organization needs to be nimble shouldn’t you be able to make decisions faster than that? To overcome this as a business user, start with a coherent set of sample data and then prototype what you want in your role-based reports and dashboards, including objectives and goals. You should define the calculations, granularity, security, availability and as much agreement from business leadership as you can before approaching IT. Your month long sprints should include visible deliverables back to the business even if they are very small iterative improvements.

Pro tip: Your business intelligence architect is the best translator between business and IT, they will make this communication much easier.

Organizational change and data visibility is unsettling

When you first begin your BI initiative you will probably begin with interviews to better understand your processes from the different subject matter experts and data stewards. Through these interviews it will be pretty easy to spot who is not on board with your project. Everyone is busy and it’s not easy to squeeze out more time for yet another “pet” project of the higher-ups. Not to mention it may require change to already overburdened workers who are trying to do the best they can with less budget and time. But there can be other reasons as well, data visibility can expose weaknesses or mitigate control over a certain functional area. On the positive side, data visibility can also expose strengths and opportunities which may be leveraged in other areas. Once again, focusing on the ultimate objectives, clear an honest communication and support from the executive team is essential to moving through road blocks. The challenge is to make the change process as positive as possible for all involved. Rapid and successful improvements in processes leading to better metrics will help show value and increase confidence in the initiative.Pro tip: During requirements be sure to measure the current state process in terms of hours or cost or opportunity and then the improved state so later you can show your BI on BI in the form of ROI.

Don’t exclusively focus on financial metrics

At the end of the quarter or year it’s not uncommon to get a report on sales revenue, cost of goods sold, other expenses and profit. But by the time these are realized whatever variables led to these metrics are impossible to change for the current timeframe. You could only look in your rear view mirror for potential fixes to be applied to the next quarter or year. The goal should be to develop an early warning system amongst your operational, customer and employee metrics where if changes are made early enough you would still have time to moderate the effects. Think of your processes as a linear timeline that may intersect other processes. For example, if the goal is to reduce customer acquisition cost by increasing customer retention you might measure employee support training or development speed on customer requested functionality. Both of these processes affect financial performance but the leading indicators allow for much earlier identification and improvement prior to their impact on the bottom line.

Pro Tip: Use what-if scenarios to determine the highest impact leading indicators and set your goals. Indicators can be rated on impact, probability and complexity. Also be sure that you are using key performance indicators and not metrics, KPIs are mostly measured using percentages, indexes and ratios.

So the takeaway from starting and progressing a business intelligence initiative in your organization can have challenges but they can be overcome. Get strong executive sponsorship and involvement, start with a vertical challenge that can provide the best ROI, deliver a role-based solution that can be quickly deployed, understand that change and data visibility can be unsettling so make it a positive experience and finally, start with the financial metrics you want to improve but then identify as far back in the processes as possible those metrics and roles that affect them.